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Monthly markets review - February 2022

March 4th, 2022 Back To News & Insights

Monthly markets review - February 2022

  • US stocks fell in February, as investors tried to process the implications of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.
  • Eurozone shares fell in February, underperforming other regions. Europe has a significant reliance on Russian energy, especially gas, and the invasion saw energy prices spike higher.
  • UK equities were broadly unchanged over February. The picture was very similar to January, with shares of larger companies rising.
  • Asia equities recorded a modest decline in February following a volatile month on global stock markets after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine towards the end of the month.

Please note any past performance mentioned is not a guide to future performance and may not be repeated. The sectors, securities, regions and countries shown are for illustrative purposes only and are not to be considered a recommendation to buy or sell.

US

US stocks fell in February, as investors tried to process the implications of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The US imposed a broad range of severe sanctions on Russia after the invasion. The US has banned transactions with the Russian central bank and, in collaboration with other major governments, has sought to stop it from deploying foreign reserves. Restrictions have been placed on the nation’s key financial institutions – including Sberbank and VTB - as well as its wealthiest individuals and families. The US has also cut Russia out of the Swift International Payments System, along with similar exclusions from the system by other major economic powers.

Beyond these events, the US economic picture remained broadly unchanged. US growth continues to look robust while inflation is elevated. Industrial activity – as represented by the flash composite purchasing managers’ index (PMI) - rose to 56 this month from 51.1 in January. US inflation, released early in the month, surprised to the upside. Headline CPI rose to 7.5% year on year in January; the fastest pace since 1982. Rising prices are a key contributor to weaker consumer confidence. (The PMI indices, produced by IHS Markit, are based on survey data from companies in the manufacturing and services sectors. A reading above 50 signals expansion.)

Most areas of the market struggled in February. Energy was the only sector to make gains, with oil and gas prices increasing steeply. All other sectors declined. The tech and communication services sectors were among the weakest.

Europe

Eurozone shares fell in February, underperforming other regions. Europe has a significant reliance on Russian energy, especially gas, and the invasion saw energy prices spike higher. The consumer discretionary and financials sectors were the worst performers, reflecting expectations for pressure on consumer spending and economic activity as energy prices rise. More defensive sectors such as healthcare, communication services and utilities were among the better performers but all sectors saw losses.

The eurozone’s annual inflation rate was confirmed at 5.1% in January, up from 5.0% in December 2021. Of this, energy price inflation accounted for more than half of the rise. Early in February, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde had declined to rule out an interest rate rise this year in response to higher inflation. However, the Ukraine crisis may now make it less likely that the central bank would tighten monetary policy.

The European Union and individual European countries announced sanctions on Russia and policy changes as a result of the unfolding crisis. These included a commitment by Germany to increase its defence spending. Germany also suspended the approval of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline.

UK

UK equities were broadly unchanged over February. The picture was very similar to January, with shares of larger companies rising. This was driven this month by the mining, healthcare and oil sectors, while small and mid cap equities recorded losses. One change from January was a greater presence of more traditionally defensive sectors among the market’s outperforming areas. These included consumer goods, drinks and utility companies, to take three examples.

Consensus earnings growth estimates for UK quoted companies remained steady in February. Many companies reassured the market on their forecasts as they published full-year results. This was despite concerns that the full impact of inflationary trends are yet to be factored into profit margin expectations.

The latest monthly GDP data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) revealed that UK output contracted by 0.2% in the month of December as restrictions were re-introduced following the rise in Covid-19 cases linked to the Omicron variant. Despite this, the estimated fall in activity was less severe than feared by the consensus among economists, which had predicted a drop of 0.6%. The Bank of England raised interest rates by 0.25 percentage points, to 0.5%, as the ONS revealed that the consumer price index rose by 5.5% in the 12 months to January, a 30-year high.

Asia

Asia equities recorded a modest decline in February following a volatile month on global stock markets after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine towards the end of the month. News that Russian president Vladimir Putin had put the country’s nuclear forces on high alert intensified fears that the conflict could escalate, weakening investor sentiment further.

Stocks in China and Hong Kong slipped as US and European countries started to impose economic sanctions on Russia, leading to commodity price rises and fresh concerns over higher inflation. In Hong Kong, technology stocks declined due to new concerns over changing regulatory rules in China.

Stocks in India also ended the month in the red amid weak investor sentiment due to the crisis in Ukraine. Share prices in Taiwan were lower, with a mixed performance from financial and technology stocks, while prices in Singapore also ended the month in the red. Despite periods of volatility during the month, share prices in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand ended the month in positive territory.

After an initial recovery from January’s weakness, the Japanese stock market ended February with a loss of 0.4%. The yen ended the month little changed against the US dollar, although there was some underlying strength in the second half of the month as global uncertainty increased.

Emerging Markets

Emerging market (EM) equities registered a negative return in February as geopolitical tensions took centre stage. Russian equities and the rouble plummeted as President Putin launched a full-scale invasion of neighbouring Ukraine. Risk aversion impacted other emerging European markets, specifically Hungary and Poland which also fell sharply. Egypt, which is likely to see some economic impact through the loss of tourist revenues from Russian and Ukrainian visitors, underperformed the broader EM index.

Rising energy prices as a result of Russia’s war in Ukraine were a headwind for net EM importers, notably India which also lagged. China underperformed by a smaller margin. Conversely, Peru was the best-performing index market, benefitting from stronger metals prices, along with Brazil and South Africa. Net oil exporters, particularly the UAE, but also Colombia, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, all generated positive returns and outperformed. Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand all recorded strong gains. Taiwan posted a negative return but finished ahead of the broader index.

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